Progress on targets

Thank you to our suppliers and partners for working with us towards our challenging 2020 targets. Selected key performance data is assured by PwC.

2020 targets

2020 wellbeing targets 2017 progress

Increase the sense of wellbeing for shoppers, retailers and occupiers at our places.

We track performance on this target through a number of measures:

  • Shopper scores of 84% for perception of wellbeing and 58% for facilities.
  • Retailer scores of 7.7/10 for sense of belonging at our places, 7.8/10 for satisfaction with public realm, 7.4/10 for satisfaction with enlivenment and 8.6/10 for satisfaction with customer service and hospitality from our centre teams.
  • Office occupier scores of 8.2/10 for sense of memorable experience at our places, 74% for perception of productivity and 89% for sense of pride in office space.

Deliver a WELL certified commercial office to core and shell, and set corporate policy for future developments.

We registered our development at 100 Liverpool Street as a WELL Core and Shell project.

Develop and pilot retail wellbeing specification.

We continued to pilot and refine wellbeing improvements to outdoor areas at several retail centres in 2017. These included creating green spaces, upgrading walkways and cycle links, improving accessible visitor facilities, introducing community artworks and adding children’s play areas. We also started discussions with a retail occupier to pilot wellbeing innovations through a fit out in 2018. We will draw on this to develop our retail wellbeing specification in partnership with wellbeing specialists.

Define and trial a methodology for measuring productivity in offices.

We began to trial a methodology for assessing how office design can impact productivity. In 2018, we will continue this trial and develop our understanding of the impact we can have on productivity in offices.

Research and publish on how development design impacts public health outcomes.

We explored potential research partners and continued to develop our thinking on how development design impacts public health outcomes. We will increase focus on this target in the coming years.

2020 community targets 2017 progress

Implement our Local Charter at all staffed assets and major developments.

We reviewed our community strategy across our portfolio and set this 2020 target, which we will report on from 2018.

100% of major managed assets have implemented community engagement plans.

100% of major managed properties and 80% of major developments implemented Sustainability Action Plans in 2017. These cover all four of our 2020 sustainability strategy focus areas, including Community. Implementation of the Sustainability Action Plans is now embedded within the management responsibilities of our places and we will no longer report on this target.

90% employee volunteering.

90% British Land employee volunteering – achieving our 2020 target three years early (2016: 84%). We have now increased focus on skills-based volunteering.

20% employee skills-based volunteering.

16% British Land employee skills-based volunteering (2016: 16%). Having expanded our partnerships, we are introducing new initiatives to drive further progress towards our 2020 target.

2020 futureproofing targets 2017 progress

55% landlord energy intensity total portfolio reduction, based on index score of 45 against 2009 score of 100.

35% reduction in energy intensity across our portfolio compared to 2009 (index score of 65 /100). Although energy intensity went up slightly year-on-year, the overall trend remains positive against our baseline, and we have a clear roadmap to achieve our 55% reduction target by 2020.

55% Scope 1 and 2 carbon intensity reduction, based on index score of 45 against 2009 score of 100.

44% reduction in Scope 1 and 2 carbon intensity across our portfolio compared to 2009 (index score 56 /100), on track for our 2020 target. For consistency with previous years, carbon intensity was calculated using the location based methodology. When the market based methodology is applied to our total Scope 2 carbon emissions, they reduce by 28,000 tonnes, factoring in that most of the electricity we purchase comes from renewable sources (REGO backed). During the coming year, we will review our carbon reporting methodology.

15% reduction in landlord embodied carbon intensity for projects over £50m against 2015 per m².

All development projects over £50m are measuring embodied carbon and working on reduction strategies. We will report on progress in 2018.

Zero waste to landfill.

98% of waste diverted from landfill at our properties and developments (2016: 98%), continuing to show strong performance as we work towards our 2020 target.

2020 skills and opportunity targets 2017 progress
All tier 1 suppliers at major properties and developments to have local procurement and SME plans. 100% of major managed properties and 80% of major developments implemented Sustainability Action Plans in 2017. These cover all four of our 2020 sustainability strategy focus areas, including Skills and Opportunity, which covers local procurement and SMEs. Implementation of the Sustainability Action Plans is now embedded within the management responsibilities of our places and we will no longer report on this target.
3% of tier 1 and 2 supplier workforce to be apprentices (for prioritised suppliers).

In our pilot study, 18 tier 1 suppliers and 65 tier 2 development suppliers provided data on apprentices and employees. In this pilot study, 1.7% of our tier 1 supplier workforce and 3.1% of our tier 2 development supplier workforce is made up of apprentices. As we move from a voluntary pilot focusing on key suppliers to working with a broader range of suppliers, the proportion of apprentices may reduce. This is because the pilot study included a high proportion of construction firms employing large numbers of apprentices and because companies that did not respond might not be performing as well in this area.

To support apprenticeships in our supply chain, we launched our Apprenticeship Framework for our managed portfolio. Across our entire portfolio, we also delivered training and funded specialist external support for suppliers, focusing on areas where we have the greatest opportunity to increase apprenticeships. In 2018, we will launch an apprenticeship programme in our Group offices.

100% of tier 1 and 2 contracts Supply Chain Charter compliant (for prioritised contracts).

We continue to work closely with our suppliers to ensure that they understand and implement our Supply Chain Charter, which covers 12 key areas aligned with our 2020 sustainability strategy. These include standards for health and wellbeing, community engagement, energy and carbon, materials and waste, local employment, skills, fair practices and overall management.

Since 2016, all our new contracts have required tier 1 suppliers to report compliance with our Supply Chain Charter. During the coming year, we will also ask strategic and preferred suppliers to sign up to our Supply Chain Charter, covering the majority of spend. In addition, we will work in partnership with our tier 1 suppliers to expand activities with tier 2 suppliers, including pilot studies on developments. We will report on progress in 2018.

Progress on 2017 innovation projects

2017 wellbeing projects 2017 progress

Office Lab: Pilot low-cost interventions to improve wellbeing, informing future technology and design in offices.

 

We continued to trial low-cost interventions to improve wellbeing and developed a guidance document that we are discussing with occupiers. Low-cost interventions include installing air quality sensors, increasing internal planting and introducing standing desks. We continue to investigate how technology can assist in designing and operating for wellbeing.

In addition, we launched our Wellbeing Committee for employees. This is helping us establish links between workspace and workplace, identifying what makes a great place to work.

Occupier Collaboration: Continue to work with occupiers to implement the World Green Building Council framework for measuring health and wellbeing, as well as developing a Fit Out Guide for occupiers and introducing a dashboard for wellbeing and productivity in our buildings.

We continue to investigate opportunities for wellbeing collaboration with occupiers, sharing our approach as a landlord.

We have now completed four office and retail projects that apply the World Green Building Council framework for measuring health and wellbeing. In 2017, these comprised an occupier in 3 Sheldon Square and mall space at Meadowhall. Earlier projects comprised our own offices at York House and Broadgate Estates at 2 Kingdom Street.

We are updating our Fit Out Guide for occupiers to incorporate the WELL Standard principles. We will publish this in 2018.

We developed a prototype dashboard to report internal environmental quality. We are testing this with occupiers and the property team at 20 Triton Street.

WELL Certification: Start a project for a core and shell that achieves the WELL Building Standard, certifying the performance of building features that impact health and wellbeing.

We registered our development at 100 Liverpool Street as a WELL Core and Shell project.

We held a series of design workshops with the development team to introduce them to WELL and ensure its requirements are integrated into the design. We also reviewed and amended our Office Design Guide, so WELL is taken into account when designing our office developments.

2017 community projects 2017 progress

Community Fund: Implement the Regent’s Place Community Fund with occupiers and local partners, with a view to rolling out similar funds at other properties.

The Regent’s Place Community Fund, a joint initiative between occupiers, British Land and the Regent’s Place management team, invested £30,000 in local community projects in 2017. These included a job club for people at risk of homelessness, a health club for the over 60s, mentoring for students and accessible theatre performances for local residents. Regent’s Place occupiers and suppliers also signed up to a second year of funding. We are now exploring opportunities to implement the model elsewhere within our portfolio.

Section 106 Review: Review our performance against Section 106 and public commitments on a development.

Following the Brexit referendum, we have focused resources on reviewing and progressing our community strategy.

Trust: Explore the relationship between community trust and the creation of Places People Prefer. We will set our target this year.

Following the Brexit referendum, we reviewed our community strategy across our portfolio. We redefined our approach and set a 2020 target to: Implement our Local Charter at all staffed assets and major developments.

2017 futureproofing projects 2017 progress

Embodied Carbon: Operate embodied carbon accounting alongside cost accounts on all four developments at Broadgate, and review success in achieving reductions through procurement.

We are operating an embodied carbon budget at our 100 Liverpool Street development at Broadgate. We will review success in achieving reductions as the project progresses. We will operate embodied carbon accounting for additional Broadgate developments as they come on stream.

Photovoltaic Panels: Review performance of our pilot project at St Stephen’s, Hull, and develop business case for wider roll out, investing where appropriate.

The photovoltaic installation at St Stephen’s, Hull, produced 228,220 kWh of on site energy in 2017, performing at 104% of its modelled target. A 300 kW installation is due to be fitted at Serpentine Green, Peterborough, in May 2018, and a further installation is progressing to detailed design stage. We are actively investigating further opportunities.

Retail Waste Commercialisation: Carry out a feasibility study into viable technologies for waste, aligning with increased food and beverage offer and including existing waste streams.

We commissioned an in-depth waste review at Meadowhall, undertaken by Arup. With around 280 occupiers, including over 50 places to eat and drink, Meadowhall is the largest producer of waste in our retail portfolio. The review identified various technologies for further evaluation. We are now exploring their viability for deployment across the portfolio.

Apprenticeship Framework: Launch a framework for British Land and Broadgate Estates to support apprenticeships across our supply chain.

We launched an Apprenticeship Framework for our managed portfolio to support our suppliers in creating and sustaining apprenticeships.

Download our Framework: www.britishland.com/policies

2017 skills and opportunity projects 2017 progress

Broadgate Legacy Framework: Establish a vision and approach for community, education, skills and training including apprentices through the framework agreement to redevelop Broadgate with Sir Robert McAlpine.

Alongside our Broadgate delivery partner, Sir Robert McAlpine, we have set out a Broadgate Legacy Framework with an approved vision and approach for community, education, local businesses, skills and training, including apprentices. The Framework encompasses four core pillars: education, employment, business and culture. Detailed work plans are now being undertaken.

Pre-Employment Course: Develop a bespoke pre-employment course for our retail assets, aligned with our customer service programme and the needs of our retailers and planning activity.

We piloted a bespoke pre-employment training course, ‘Bright Lights Starting Out in Retail and Hospitality’, at six retail centres. The course ran in collaboration with 29 retail and leisure occupiers and was delivered by The Source Skills Academy, which we established with Sheffield City Council in 2003. Of the 70 local jobseekers who graduated, 75% progressed straight into employment. We are expanding the course to 13 retail assets in 2018.

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